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Thamnopora cervicornis (tabulate coral)
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Striatifera striata (large brachiopod)
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Pecopteris paulinensis (fern leaf), part one
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Pecopteris paulinensis (fern leaf), part two
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Echinoconchus inexpectans (silicified brachiopods)
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D. sengeli, H. cordillerana (ammonites and bivalves)
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Sonninia washburnensis (ammonite)
7 of 19
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Zamites buchianus (cycadeoid leaf)
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Sabalites eocenica (palm leaf)
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Venericardia aragonia (clam), side one
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Venericardia aragonia (clam), side two
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Pinnixia eocenica (crab in nodule)
12 of 19
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Aturia kerniana (nautiloid), side one
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Aturia kerniana (nautiloid), side two
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Ophiocrossota baconi (starfish)
15 of 19
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Eoscutella coosensis (sand dollar)
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"Ficus" quisimbingi (fig leaf)
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Novumbra oregonensis (mudminnow)
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Castanea basidentata (leaf)
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View the entire gallery or click the above images to enlarge.

A major strength of the fossil collections recently acquired from Professor Retallack are fossils from Oregon with precise geological and locality data. The most important piece of scientific information on a fossil is its exact location, because this enables detailed scientific work on such questions as paleoenvironmental change and rates of evolution. Fossils from Oregon, acquired largely on student field trips over the past three decades, have been collected within a modern geological framework and with benefit of accurate topographic maps and GPS technology. Photography by Joseph Davis, text by Edward Davis, and web development by Keith Hamm. Images © UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History. Production of this gallery was generously supported by The Ford Family Foundation.